Tag Archives: tomatoes

What Will I Grow in 2019

One sunny day in 14 days

Planted in sun…then the floods!

Okay, so it’s a bit early to be planning the 2019 garden! I just barely finished planting this year’s garden!! But I needed a lift.

I’m a bit depressed. It has rained for 13 of the last 14 days. It will be raining for the next 3 days, at least. My rain gauge – the wheelbarrow – is full, again. All I can think of is how soggy the roots of all my beautiful, raised from seed plants are.

And I am also thinking that the 20 asparagus crowns I put in just a little over 3 weeks ago are rotting below their lovingly applied layers of compost, soil and straw.

Rain is bad enough but the temperatures are not helping, either. Our highs are in the low to mid-60’s; our lows are in the mid 50’s. Today, we will hit the low 80’s then drop to 51 degrees with…thunder storms.

So, I did what any self-respecting, home bound gardener does; I went seed shopping and here is what I got from Territorial Seed:

Autumn Harvest Beet Blend –  this is a new and what Territorial calls a, ” distinctive blend of Red  Ace, Boldor and White Albino. This blend will let me

Beet blend from Territorial Seed

Territorial Seed knows beets!

grow a range of colors that will make great ferments and relishes and will be stunning to look at, served fresh with butter.

Kalettes make great chips

Bite-sized kale ready for chips!.

Five Color Silverbeet Swiss Chard Organic – blending 5 varieties of chard,  Australian heirloom boasts a, “…day-glow mix of red, orange, yellow, pink and white.” Upright growth and juicy, tender stalks and succulent leaves, just what you want in Swiss chard!

Autumn Star Kalettes® –  Bite-sized, loose heads of frilly kale growing on brussel sprout-like stalks, the leaves are green and purple. These are new for this year and I for one will enjoy making kale chips with them!

Palco Spinach Organic – from seed to salad in 38 days, Territorial calls this spinach, “…adaptable to planting in both cool and warm seasons, versatile for harvest as young, baby greens or full-sized, and bolt and disease resistant.” What’s not to like?

Music & Purple Glazer Garlic –  both hard neck and both mid-season.

Territorial Seed has garlic

Hard neck garlic I love!

I love these garlics for their reliability in the ground and amazing flavor. And I love that they keep for months so I can enjoy homegrown, organic garlic all the way through the winter!

I complemented my order from Territorial Seed Company with some seeds from another favorite organic source, Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds.

Here is what I ordered from Baker Creek to lift my spirits:

Blauhilde Bean – my all time favorite pole bean with a great growth habit and prolific production of the tastiest green beans on the planet…which are actually deep purple pods! In any case, I have not planted any other pole bean or green bean since I met Blauhilde.

Prosperosa eggplant

Prosperosa eggplant from Baker  Creek

Prosperosa Eggplant – straight out of Tuscany by way of Baker Seeds, this beautiful eggplant is round to slightly teardrop shaped, and sometimes very slightly ribbed.

The deep purple exterior holds the mild, tender white flesh that’s  as good as the fruit looks. The Prosperosa and the Bianca Rosa are my favorite eggplants.

German Lunchbox Tomato – The fruits of this tomato are supposedly the size of a small egg. Pink and sugar sweet, Baker Creek Heirlooms say they are begging to be eaten. Perfectly sized for salads or putting in the lunchbox and my “new” tomato for 2019.

Tendergreen Burpless Cucumber – I have developed a liking for cukes that don’t disrupt my digestion, hence the burpless variety I ordered this year.  Medium-dark green, 7-12 inches long and prolific, I also bought these because, per the description, they tolerate cool soil and excessive moisture better than many. Welcome to my world!

Queen of the May butterhead lettuce

Queen of the May butterhead lettuce from Baker Creek

May Queen Lettuce – I am a sucker for butterhead lettuce….

This one is called the crown jewel of the heirloom garden. “Tender, yellow hearts are gently blushed rose, and the leaves are ethereally soft with the buttery sweet flavor.” Yum.  And good for planting in early in Spring or in Fall.

BTW now is the best time to get your heirloom, non-GMO, organic seeds from companies like Territorial Seed Company and Baker Creek Heirloom seeds. Wait too long, especially for garlic, and they will all be gone!

There will be more seeds in my 2019 garden plan and probably replacement asparagus crowns (now that the trenches are already dug). But just knowing that these are on the way is making me smile on yet, another gray day!

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Practical Organic Gardening – Growing Tomatoes!

fox cherry tomatoes

Fox Cherry tomatoes are a staple in my garden.

As promised, it’s time to start thinking about what to plant. Most gardeners, me included, rely on one summertime favorite, the tomato, to grace their gardens every year!

Why tomatoes?

Tomatoes are pretty hardy plants.  And they’re happy growing in containers.  They’ll even grow hanging from a hook, upside down.    So, even if you don’t have any space for a garden plot, even if you can’t grow anything else, you can grow tomatoes.

If you’re new to gardening, you might want to start with a few tomato plants instead of starting seed. Why?

Tomatoes from seeds

Tomato seedlings growing indoors.

Most warm weather crops  like tomatoes, should be started 10 to 12 weeks before your last frost.

In my zone, Zone 6a, that means I am in the basement, filling peat pots and dropping in seeds in the second week of February.

From the moment the seeds go into the pots until I get them ready for transplant, I have to pay attention – keep them warm, water them, feed them and ensure they are healthy and happy.

So, if you’re just starting out, buying plants may be a lot easier and a lot less risky.

Tomato Basics
Before we talk about the hundreds of varieties of tomatoes available today, let’s talk about a couple of categories that you should know about when you pick seeds or buy plants, namely determinate and indeterminate.

Tomatoes come in both these varieties.  What’s the difference? Determinate varieties bear their crop all at once and tend to be more compact.  Don’t have much space?  Try these.

Indeterminate tomatoes bear fruit all season and grow longer vines.

Organic tomatoes on a trellis

Tomatoes enjoying their trellis.

These vines require support (staking or caging) over the growing season.   Got room and a couple of fence sections?  Try these.

I usually plant both so I can make tomato sauce, paste and barbecue sauce with the determinate varieties and eat the indeterminate tomatoes all summer long.

Now let’s talk about types of tomatoes?  From this organic gardener’s chair, I think of tomatoes as coming in three types – plum tomatoes, slicers and cherry or grape tomatoes.

 

  1. Plums – these are the kind you can use to make great tomato paste or pasta sauce with.
  2. Slicers – these are great for burgers or sliced and served with just a salt shaker.
  3. Cherry or Grape Tomatoes – these are tiny bundles of tomato flavor that taste great right off the vine.

Again, I plant a few of all three types because I love them.  You can pick and choose the ones you like the best and plant those.

Tips on Planting Tomatoes
Tomatoes are warm weather plants; they really don’t like cold soil or cold air.  You can plant them out on the ragged fringe of your last frost date but putting them in the ground too early may just stunt their growth.  So tomatoes should not go into your ground until the soil temperature is at least 60 degrees.

Tomatoes should be given some room to breathe.  Plants should be 2 to 3 feet apart and rows should be 3 feet apart.  This gives the tomato plants room to spread out, especially the indeterminate ones that can grow vines that are more than 9 feet long.

NOTE:  Overcrowding is a mistake I make over and over again and by August, I can’t reach my plants and bugs are having a field day dining on ripe tomatoes. Space them better and get better crops and fewer pests.  (Now to get me to follow my own advice….)

When planting tomatoes in the ground:

  1. Pick a nice sunny spot that drains well.  The slight slope in my garden ensures that the roots of the tomato plants are wet but don’t drown.
  2. Remove all containers (plastic or clay) from the plants except peat pots.  If using peat pots, just grasp the bottom and start to close your fist.  That pincer movement punches small holes in the bottom that roots can slide through quickly.
  3. Strip off all but the top set of leaves.
  4. Make sure you dig a hole that is deep enough to bury the stem up to the very last set of leaves at the top.  Yes, I really do mean bury them deep.  The stem that you put underground will send out roots and very quickly anchor the plant and give it a lot of opportunities to take up nutrients and water.
  5. Fill the hole with the dirt you removed and tamp it down to make sure there are no pockets of air around the roots.
  6. Water the transplants in by pouring 1 or 2 cups of water on the ground at the base of the stem of each plant immediately after transplanting.  NOTE:  You can use a very weak liquid fertilizer (2 tablespoons to a gallon of water) if you want but I don’t fertilize until about 2 weeks after I have transplanted.
  7. Mulch with straw around each transplant.  Mulching also makes for a weed free garden – the only state I want to be in when it comes to gardening.  It also ensures that moisture is retained and to make sure rain water doesn’t splash up on the leaves of the tomato plants.  Water that splashes up off the soil can cause verticulum wilt or mosaic tobacco virus, the two most common diseases in the tomato family.  By the way, never smoke in your garden – you can make your plants sick, literally.

Stake your tomato babies when you plant them.  Tomatoes grow fast so if you wait, it may be too late to get a tomato cage or a stake in place.  Staking prevents some diseases and improves your yield.  It also makes it much easier to pick once the plants start producing fruit.

staking tomatoes

Staking with found items

What should you use for stakes?  Visit any gardening or hardware store and pick up wooden stakes or, my favorite, metal stakes.  I also use old fence section and have been known to use an old box spring on occasion.

If it doesn’t rain and/or if it is very hot during the first week after transplanting, make sure to check the plants to see if they are drooping or wilting and pour another cup or two of water on them if they are.

Once your tomato babies are in the ground and have weathered the first week, there are only a couple of things you need to do to ensure a good crop:

Always pinch off the first flowers on all your tomato plants.  The plants are still trying to get established in the ground.  They don’t need babies to distract them from growing into strong, healthy plants.

When the second set of flowers appear on the plants, mix 2 tablespoons of Epsom salts into one gallon of water and use one cup for every foot of height the plant has – 2 feet = 2 cups.  Epsom salts provide magnesium and sulfur – both needed to produce chlorophyll and allow for proper absorption of phosphorous and nitrogen.  NOTE:  Don’t use too much Epsom salts.  If you do, you will get lots of beautiful, green leaves and bushy plants but not many tomatoes.

Tomatoes should get 1 to 2 inches of rain a week.  If it doesn’t rain, make sure you water them.  I use soaker hoses.  Soaker hoses save water and prevent the spread of soil borne diseases.

Tomato horn worm eating tomatoes.

A tomato horn

Keep an eye out for the tomato hornworm – a big green caterpillar that likes to eat tomato plants.  If you see one munching through your garden and you don’t have trichogamma wasps, use pliers if you have to but pull it off and kill it.

If you have trichogamma wasps, sit back and watch the show.

Trichogramma wasp eggs on hornworm

Wasp eggs on hornworm

The wasp lays eggs on the hornworm. When the larvae hatch, they dine on their host. It’s not pretty but the wasps are an effective and natural control for these destructive pests.

If you planted indeterminate tomatoes, take a few minutes a week to check for and remove the axillary or side shoots that come off the plant.  But don’t go crazy and strip off a whole lot of leaves.  Tomatoes can get sunburned – really – and burned fruit just doesn’t taste all that good.

So trim lightly. Keep the plants from getting too bushy. Use their energy for  production.

Fertilize your tomato plants when the fruit are an inch or more long. I use fish emulsion mixed with water and poured around the roots of every plant.  This is sometimes called “side-dressing” a plant.  Another free fertilizer is crushed eggshells. Just put about 1/2 cup of crushed shells around the base of each plant.

You can side dress the second time right after picking the first ripe fruit and make a 3rd and final application a month later.

When it comes to harvesting your tomatoes, you can do it by look and feel or you can do it by temperature.  If the average daily temperature is around 75 degrees and the fruits are red, they are ready to be picked.  And don’t refrigerate tomatoes.  The flavor and quality of the tomato will be much better if it is kept at room temperature.

One of my favorite resources for learning about tomatoes is online.  Although it is a Missouri extension office, the basic information works for any gardener, almost anywhere.

And that is how to grow tomatoes.

 

2015 Organic Garden in the Ground!

I got all of my plants in the ground – wrapping up planting today.  All organic seed, all raised by me in my basement and all hand-planted.

Granted, the garden doesn’t look like much right now but give it a few weeks and the size and shape of every plant will change as they fill in their spaces!

My garden is all planted.

All my plants are in the garden and ready to grow.

Here’s the inventory!  And, instead of talking about them, here are pictures of the newly transplanted, beautiful babies.

Eggplant baby.

Eggplant transplant just in the ground.

I put in 4 different types of tomatoes – 12 plants – Golden Slicer, Fir, Fox Cherry & San Marzano

Sweet Italian Peppers – 14 plants

Organic Italian sweet peppers

Inverted tomato cages help support my Italian sweet pepper plants.

Eggplants – 5 plants – Dusky and Melanzana Prosperosa

Zukes – 3 plants – saved seeds from last year’s Italian Zuchetta

Cukes – Saber F1 from Seeds of Change and Cetriolo from Grow Italian.

Kale – 10 plants – Curly, Russian, Dino & some unknowns from Adaptiv Seeds

Beets – lots and lots of plants – Cylindra and Early Wonder

Lettuce – Butterhead, Red Oak & a mix of saved seeds from last year and

Organic red leaf lettuce

Organic red leaf lettuce grows quickly and tastes sweet by itself or in salads.

Onions – 100 plants which I did not raise. I got these from an Amish friend.

Oh, and my thornless blackberries are growing and greening up!  And right below them, my gorgeous blueberries are covered with flowers.  Planted once, harvest every year for 20 years+ – organic gardening really is easy!

Thornless blackberries

My Doyle thornless blackberry bushes getting ready for summer.

Blueberry bushes laden with flowers.

Every flower on every blueberry bush becomes a blueberry — 60 quarts every summer.